Math

Inside The Mind of Jaxon Cota: An 11 Year Old Genius

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11 year-old Jaxon Cota looks like a normal boy, but he has something hiding within. That is, he is probably smarter than you, and most of us.

Cota was admitted to MENSA two years ago at the age of 9 after scoring 148 on an IQ test. That score was good enough to put him in the top 2nd percentile of all people on the planet.

Jaxon has a special affinity for numbers. He was able to read numbers up to 15 digits by the age of two, into the quadrillions. Now, he does high school level math to challenge himself when he’s bored.

He also is adept at math competitions. He was nearly perfect at MathCON, a national math competition for students in grades 5-12, where he placed 7th out of about 45,000 students.

image“Numbers have always just kinda stuck out to me,” the boy told NBC in a recent interview. “There are just so many things about numbers that are fascinating and so many things to learn.”

“There’s a rhythm to numbers,” said Jaxon’s father, Matthew Cota. “And just something about that is, in a weird way, very simple for him.”

imageOn the surface, he is a boy who loves to play baseball. Below the surface is the science. ”There is just naturally a lot of thinking that’s involved with it,” he said. “There’s statistics and where you have to be on each play.”

The boy is talented enough to skip grades, but both he and his parents choose to stick with his age-assigned grade levels. Regarding skipping grades, he says: ”It’s not something that I’d want to do, because I wouldn’t be able to do the things I love like play baseball or hang out with my friends.”

He is now in sixth grade, where he receives advanced instruction to keep him challenged. His parents believe that it is important that he grows up with his peers.

“Kids that are profoundly gifted are pigeonholed to be one way,” said Lori Cota, Jaxon’s mom. “He’s four years old and he can read, he can do all these things, but he can’t tie his shoes. There are things in every grade level that you need to learn.”

Check out the in-depth coverage of Jaxon Cota in the video below!

God’s Mathematical Design Of The Universe–The Fibonacci Sequence

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It makes absolutely no sense to me why we are not teaching this kind of stuff in school but it’s just the way it is, right?

In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers or Fibonacci sequence are the numbers in the following integer sequence:[1][2]

1,\;1,\;2,\;3,\;5,\;8,\;13,\;21,\;34,\;55,\;89,\;144,\; \ldots\;

or (often, in modern usage):

0,\;1,\;1,\;2,\;3,\;5,\;8,\;13,\;21,\;34,\;55,\;89,\;144,\; \ldots\; OEISA000045.

The Fibonacci spiral: an approximation of the golden spiral created by drawing circular arcs connecting the opposite corners of squares in the Fibonacci tiling;[3] this one uses squares of sizes 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, and 34.

By definition, the first two numbers in the Fibonacci sequence are either 1 and 1, or 0 and 1, depending on the chosen starting point of the sequence, and each subsequent number is the sum of the previous two.

In mathematical terms, the sequence Fn of Fibonacci numbers is defined by the recurrence relation

F_n = F_{n-1} + F_{n-2},\!\,

with seed values[1][2]

F_1 = 1,\; F_2 = 1

or[4]

F_0 = 0,\; F_1 = 1.

The Fibonacci sequence is named after Italian mathematician Fibonacci. His 1202 book Liber Abaci introduced the sequence to Western European mathematics,[5] although the sequence had been described earlier in Indian mathematics.[6][7][8] By modern convention, the sequence begins either with F0 = 0 or with F1 = 1. The Liber Abaci began the sequence with F1 = 1.

Fibonacci numbers are closely related to Lucas numbers L_n in that they form a complementary pair of Lucas sequences U_n(1,-1)=F_n and V_n(1,-1)=L_n. They are intimately connected with the golden ratio; for example, the closest rational approximations to the ratio are 2/1, 3/2, 5/3, 8/5, … . Applications include computer algorithms such as the Fibonacci search technique and the Fibonacci heap data structure, and graphs called Fibonacci cubes used for interconnecting parallel and distributed systems. They also appear in biological settings,[9] such as branching in trees, phyllotaxis (the arrangement of leaves on a stem), the fruit sprouts of a pineapple,[10] the flowering of an artichoke, an uncurling fern and the arrangement of a pine cone‘s bracts.[11]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number